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Hiroshima positioned about 500 miles from Tokyo, was carefully selected as the first target. A plane released the bomb identified as “Little Boy” at 8:15 AM, and it detonated 2,000 feet directly above Hiroshima in an explosion identical to 12-15,000 tons on TNT, abolishing five square miles of the city. The atomic bomb devastated 90% of the city and killed 80,000 individuals; tens of thousands more would die of radiation exposure. Hiroshima’s devastation failed to abrupt Japanese submission, but on August 9, Major Charles Sweeney flew an added B-29 bomber where Sweeney did a secondary target, Nagasaki, where the “Fat Man” was released at 11:02 AM. More powerful than the one used at Hiroshima, the bomb weighed almost 10,000 pounds and was constructed to have a 22-kiloton detonation assassinating about 40,000 people. Japan’s Emperor Hirohito declared his country’s total submission in World War II in a radio address on August 15, citing the overwhelming power of “a new and most cruel bomb.” In the past century, the medical discoveries after the dropping of the Atomic bomb in Hiroshima have had helpful effects on scientific developments that have aided both the medical field and quality of life for people around the world. The Manhattan project opened doors to nuclear developments and applications still used today.News started spreading about the bomb specifically that it was atomic. Gradually, medics familiar with the science understood the indications were possibly radiation sickness. Attempts to provide care for the dying and extremely injured approached pointless: 14 of Hiroshima’s 16 main hospitals no longer existed; 270 of 298 hospital doctors were dead, along with 1,654 of 1,780 registered nurses. Adding to radiation sickness, there were still numerous Hiroshima people surrendering to their burns and trauma injuries from the bomb. The absence of antibiotics and medical services, combined with food scarcities, meant many perished in agony and starving. The time that came after the bombing was not easy for victims. They were identified as the hibakusha — the “bomb-affected people”. The mysterious effects of contamination also meant that hibakusha, many of whom complained of an overall, mysterious tiredness in their day-to-day lives, developed a fixation with their health, becoming preoccupied with lumps and bumps and the signs of possible cancers. In 1947, President Truman organized the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission to learn — though debated, not to treat — the hibakusha. It turned out to be one of the lengthiest epidemiological health lessons in the world. In the past century, research leading up to and after the Atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has had an abundance of helpful effects on scientific advances that have helped both the medical field and quality of life for people around the world.When looking at the economic lens we could focus on how Hiroshima’s economy was impacted by the atomic bomb. 67% of city infrastructures were completely destroyed with a 5 sq mile radius, fire and blast damages to building for miles surrounding the drop site, loss of people, homes, jobs, schools, hospital and businesses happened in exponential numbers along with utilities and public transportation being interrupted for an extended period of time. 14 of Hiroshima’s 16 main hospitals no longer existed; 270 of 298 hospital doctors were dead, along with 1,654 of 1,780 registered nurses. The absence of antibiotics and medical services, combined with food scarcities, meant many perished in agony and starving. Altogether an area of 13 square kilometers was reduced to ashes and 80% of the 76,000 buildings in the city were burned down. 60,000 buildings over 90,000 were completely demolish, leaving about 140,000 citizens homeless, causing, in some cases, even death. 5,000 feet northeast of ground zero great damages could still be seen. To be able to rebuild the city, Japan had to invest many years and billions of dollars. The “fire-wind” gave a roughly circular shape of 4.4 square miles which were completely burned. More than half the bridges in the city were destroyed, along with heavy damages to roads and railroads, which impeded communications with other cities, making it really hard to make a recount of the damages and figure out what to do. Transportation systems in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki were completely crushed, along with electrical signal systems. Political historical lens tries to study the story of political actions, concepts, structures of government, leaders and parties. It tries to give a deeper consideration of the acts of big cultures by concentrating on the effect of the top while in control and majority public reply. President Truman approved the use of the atom bombs to bring about Japan’s surrender in the Second World War. In the days succeeding the bombings Japan surrendered. Did they know what effect would take place if the Atomic Bomb was used?The Manhattan Project was the nickname for the underground US government research and engineering mission during WW II that developed the world’s first nuclear-powered weapons. President Franklin Roosevelt formed a board to investigate the likelihood of developing a nuclear weapon after he got a letter from Albert Einstein in October 1939. In his letter, Einstein cautioned the president that Nazi Germany was possibly already making efforts on creating a nuclear weapon. By August 1942, the Manhattan Project was in progress. Truman’s choice was edged by his belief that the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki would cut the wartime and in so doing would save the lives of tens or hundreds of thousands of American soldiers as well as uncountable numbers of Japanese soldiers and citizens. A total of 210,000 civilians died in the two atomic blasts. Gradually, medics familiar with the science understood the indications were possibly radiation sickness. Attempts to provide care for the dying and extremely injured approached pointless: 14 of Hiroshima’s 16 main hospitals no longer existed; 270 of 298 hospital doctors were dead, along with 1,654 of 1,780 registered nurses. Adding to radiation sickness, there were still numerous Hiroshima people surrendering to their burns and trauma injuries from the bomb. The absence of antibiotics and medical services, combined with food scarcities, meant many perished in agony and starving. The time that came after the bombing was not easy for victims. They were identified as the hibakusha — the “bomb-affected people”. The mysterious effects of contamination also meant that hibakusha, many of whom complained of an overall, mysterious tiredness in their day-to-day lives, developed a fixation with their health, becoming preoccupied with lumps and bumps and the signs of possible cancers. In 1947, President Truman organized the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission to learn — though debated, not to treat — the hibakusha. It turned out to be one of the lengthiest epidemiological health lessons in the world. In the past century, research leading up to and after the Atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has had an abundance of helpful effects on scientific advances that have helped both the medical field and quality of life for people around the world. Using suggestions from military, scientific, and government documents, the article discloses an intricate and disturbing picture of American information of radiation, mostly that there were divides between scientific information and policymaking. The writer of “A Very Pleasant way to Die” uses a historical review of the Manhattan Project’s facts of radiation and the way the managers restricted and controlled the flow of that information to the organizations of U.S. Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. The author claims that his conclusions are pertinent to the history of the Manhattan Project, to the principles of the bombings, and to inquiries involving nuclear testing and early post-war planning in the 1940s and 1950s. The quote in the title (“a very pleasant way to die””) is taken from General Leslie Grove’s testimony before a U.S. Senate group in November of 1945. Malloy concludes that “”most of the immediate and long-term biological effects of radiation on victims of the bomb were predictable at the time of the A-bomb decision

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