Literature Evaluation Table

Literature Evaluation TableStudent Name: Augusta UchenduChange Topic: It is important for healthcare staff to participate in worksite programs to reduce their weight by improving their diet and physical behaviors. This is important in improving their performance and the achievement of healthcare goals as healthcare workers spend a large percentage of their time in healthcare facilities which may limit the success of other interventions applied at home. Criteria Article 1 Article 2 Article 3 Article 4Author, Journal (Peer-Reviewed), and Permalink or Working Link to Access ArticleAbbasi, M., Majdzadeh, R., Zali, A., Karimi, A., & Akrami, F. (2018). The evolution of public health ethics frameworks: systematic review of moral values and norms in public health policy. Medicine, Health Care, And Philosophy, 21(3), 387–402.https://doi.org/10.1007/s11019-017-9813-yPoulsen, K., Cleal, B., Clausen, T., & Andersen, L. L. (2014). Work, diabetes and obesity: a seven year follow-up study among Danish health care workers. PloS one, 9(7), e103425. http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mdc&AN=25068830&site=eds-live&scope=site Hruby, A., Manson, J. E., Qi, L., Malik, V. S., Rimm, E. B., Sun, Q., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2016). Determinants and Consequences of Obesity. American Journal of Public Health, 106(9), 1656-1662.https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303326 Yeh, T. L., Chen, H. H., Chiu, H. H., Chiu, Y. H., Hwang, L. C., & Wu, S. L. (2019). Morbidity associated with overweight and obesity in health personnel: a 10-year retrospective of hospital-based cohort study in Taiwan. Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity: targets and therapy, 12, 267–274. http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.8aa97f5c27e04787b83f232a0981e5f7&site=eds-live&scope=site Article Title and Year PublishedThe evolution of public health ethics frameworks: systematic review of moral values and norms in public health policy. (2018). Work, diabetes and obesity: a seven year follow-up study among Danish health care workers. (2014). Determinants and Consequences of Obesity. (2016). Morbidity associated with overweight and obesity in health personnel: a 10-year retrospective of hospital-based cohort study in Taiwan. (2019).Research Questions (Qualitative)/Hypothesis (Quantitative), and Purposes/Aim of StudyThis research aims at identifying the evolution of public health ethics frameworks, moral values, and norms in public health practice and policy. This study seeks to provide increased knowledge about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study aims at reviewing the contribution of studies regarding nurses’ health in addressing risk factors that contribute to the development of obesity. This study aims at investigating morbidity associated with obesity in health professionalsDesign (Type of Quantitative, or Type of Qualitative)Descriptive Study Cross-Sectional Observational Study Meta-Analysis Study Retrospective Cohort StudySetting/SampleA systematic search for literature in English was conducted with no time limit up to 20 July 2017 using different key words. 56 papers that focused on the need to balance public health moral obligation to prevent harm in health promotion were analyzed. 7,305 Danish healthcare workers were issued with questionnaires to collect information regarding potential risk factors related to job and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity for seven years. The study analyzed nurses’ health studies that were conducted between 1976 and 2016. These studies involved more than 200,000 registered nurses aged between 30 to 55 years. This study examined measurements obtained during employee medical checkups between 2007 and 2016 in a Taiwan Medical Center.Methods: Intervention/InstrumentsArgument-Based Systematic Reviews by Strech and Sofaer Bivariate Comparisons And Logistic Regression Models Narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Questionnaires were also administered to collect medical and lifestyle information. Multivariable Cox ModelAnalysisOne challenge that has affected the development of effective preventive measures is the ethical concern that some interventions may interfere with personal freedom of individuals. During the seven years, 3.5% of the participants developed diabetes that was attributed to obesity. Information was collected using a food frequency questionnaire that focused on weight, waist, and upper arm measures. 10651 health personnel with 24,295 BMI measurements were recruited. Out of these, 1,992 health personnel were underweight, 13,568 had a normal BMI, 5,097 were overweight, and 3,638 obese. Key FindingsThe main goal of public health is preventing the development of diseases rather than treating the disease. However, it is important to consider moral and ethical obligation in developing public health policies The development of obesity was attributed to physical inactivity. Obesity also led to severe musculoskeletal pain. Participants in the NHS gained 0.4 kilograms per year. Increased intake of animal, saturated and trans fats was the main cause of obesity. The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was 36% with doctors having the highest incidence rate of overweight compared to nurses and supporting staff.RecommendationsFinding a common approach to address ethical issues in public health policy requires the convergence of diverse theories and philosophies of public health. The use of evidence-based research is necessary to ensure transparency and accountability. It is important to address occupational risks that may increase the chances of developing obesity. Some of the solutions include lifestyle changes, good management, and a positive work-life balance. Maintaining a healthy weight largely relies on lifestyle choices. Increased physical activity is beneficial in preventing weight gain. Since being overweight and obese are associated with a high incidence of multiple co-morbidities including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, maintaining a healthy weight is important in preventing a large burden of diseases for healthcare workers.Explanation of How the Article Supports EBP/Capstone ProjectThis article supports the Capstone project by providing important information that can be applied in the healthcare sector to develop effective interventions and policies taking into consideration the moral norms to prevent interfering with personal freedom of healthcare workers. This study provides information on occupational risks and their contribution to the development of obesity. The study also provides several recommendations to prevent obesity for healthcare workers. Information provided by this study can be used to tailor the worksite programs to focus on addressing some of the factors that contribute to the development of obesity. With information relating to the consequences of obesity to healthcare workers that include the development of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, this can be used to motivate healthcare workers to participate in worksite programs that are aimed at preventing obesity.Criteria Article 5 Article 6 Article 7 Article 8Author, Journal (Peer-Reviewed), and Permalink or Working Link to Access ArticleMaguire, S., Li, A., Cunich, M., & Maloney, D. (2019). Evaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based online training program for health professionals in eating disorders. Journal of Eating Disorders, 7, 14.https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-019-0243-5Matharu, K., Shapiro, J. F., Hammer, R. R., Kravitz, R. L., Wilson, M. D., & Fitzgerald, F. T. (2014). Reducing obesity prejudice in medical education. Education for Health (Abingdon, England), 27(3), 231–237.http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=138029205&site=eds-live&scope=site Osondu, C. U., Aneni, E. C., Shaharyar, S., Roberson, L., Rouseff, M., Das, S., & Feldman, T. (2016). The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP). Population Health Management, 19(5), 368–375.http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=118954682&site=eds-live&scope=siteTabak, R. G., Hipp, J. A., Marx, C.M., Brownson, R. C. (2015) Workplace Social and Organizational Environments and Healthy-Weight Behaviors. PLoS ONE 10(4): e0125424. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0125424Article Title and Year PublishedEvaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based online training program for health professionals in eating disorders. (2019). Reducing obesity prejudice in medical education. (2014). The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential. (2016). Workplace Social and Organizational Environments and Healthy-Weight Behaviors. (2015).Research Questions (Qualitative)/Hypothesis (Quantitative), and Purposes/Aim of StudyThis study aims at determining the effectiveness of training programs to help healthcare practitioners in early detection and treatment of individuals suffering from eating disorders to ensure the best possible health outcomes. This study aims at determining whether an educational intervention could diminish obesity prejudice. This study evaluates the impact of a comprehensive work-place lifestyle program on severe obesity among individuals at a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease in a large, diverse employee population. This study explores the relationship between workplace social environment and cultural factors and diet and physical activity behaviors and obesity among employees.Design (Type of Quantitative, or Type of Qualitative)Descriptive Analysis Cross-Sectional Study Comparative study design Descriptive AnalysisSetting/Sample1813 health professionals were registered in the Essentials program between 1 October 2013 and 31 July 2018. A randomized, controlled trial enrolling medical students from three universities for four months. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida who had more than two cardio metabolic risk factors participated in the study that was done for one year. Participants residing in four Missouri metropolitan areas between 2012 and 2013 were interviewed.Methods: Intervention/InstrumentsPre and post training questionnaires were used to assess participant’s knowledge and skills in treating individuals with eating disorders. Standard lecture intervention and a centralized web-based system to measure implicit bias and explicit bias. Intensive lifestyle modification program andMicrosoft Excel database that was exported into SAS Telephone interviews and Multivariate logistic regressionAnalysisThe Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine changes in learning outcomes before and after the learning program. Students were randomly assigned to experimental groups where information was collected to identify health workers’ attitudes and discrimination towards obese individuals that contributes to poor health outcomes. Each participant was assessed and blood and weight measurements taken. Participants underwent through a vigorous physical activity 3 times a week. They were also given an individualized nutritional plan from a registered dietitian. Measurements were taken as the start if the program, at 12 weeks, at the sixth month, and after one year. Questions focused on demographic characteristics and workplace factors related to diet and physical activities. Key FindingsOf the 1813 healthcare professionals who participated in the study, 1160 were able to complete all the learning modules. These had improved confidence and skills to treat eating disorders Students who participated in the medical lecture on managing an obese patient demonstrated explicit and implicit bias toward obese individuals. The students recommended weight loss and exercise without understanding the patient’s perspective and preferences At the end of the 12-month program, more than one quarter of participants who met criteria for bariatric surgery at baseline no longer met the criteria. More than half of the bariatric surgery eligible participants had also significantly improved. Some of the factors that influenced health behaviors include age, worksite size, income, and age. Workers engaging in healthy behaviors increased as worksite size increased. RecommendationsThe Essentials program provides an effective way of addressing eating disorders. Emphatic imagination can be used to reduce bias as it stimulates a better understanding of the perspective of others. Workplace wellness programs can minimize the need for bariatric surgery for individual with severe obesity. Managers should improve the workplace environment to encourage employees to engage in healthy behaviors. Healthcare professionals should engage in healthy behaviors to prevent obesity. Explanation of How the Article Supports EBP/CapstoneThis article supports the use of the Essentials program in improving healthcare professionals’ knowledge to help them in early detection and treatment of eating disorders. This knowledge can be used to develop effective worksite programs that help the workers to address eating disorders affecting some of them. This study can be used to inform healthcare workers about their bias towards patients. Healthcare workers may also be faced by this if the reverse occurs. This will help them to treat patient fairy as well as improve their health status to prevent being affected by obesity that may lead to the development of chronic illnesses. Bariatric surgery is associated with obese individuals. However, implementing workplace wellness programs can help individuals to address obesity and prevent the need for bariatric surgery. This article highlights the importance of implementing workplace programs to help healthcare workers in preventing obesity. This article supports the Capstone project by showing how the work environment impacts healthcare workers to engage in healthy behaviors. Information provided by this article can be used to inform healthcare leaders in developing successful worksite programs.ReferencesAbbasi, M., Majdzadeh, R., Zali, A., Karimi, A., & Akrami, F. (2018). The evolution of public health ethics frameworks: systematic review of moral values and norms in public health policy. Medicine, Health Care, And Philosophy, 21(3), 387–402.Hruby, A., Manson, J. E., Qi, L., Malik, V. S., Rimm, E. B., Sun, Q., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2016). Determinants and Consequences of Obesity. American Journal of Public Health, 106(9), 1656-1662.Maguire, S., Li, A., Cunich, M., & Maloney, D. (2019). Evaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based online training program for health professionals in eating disorders. Journal of Eating Disorders, 7, 14.Matharu, K., Shapiro, J. F., Hammer, R. R., Kravitz, R. L., Wilson, M. D., & Fitzgerald, F. T. (2014). Reducing obesity prejudice in medical education. Education for Health (Abingdon, England), 27(3), 231–237.Osondu, C. U., Aneni, E. C., Shaharyar, S., Roberson, L., Rouseff, M., Das, S., & Feldman, T. (2016). The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP). Population Health Management, 19(5), 368–375.Poulsen, K., Cleal, B., Clausen, T., & Andersen, L. L. (2014). Work, diabetes and obesity: a seven year follow-up study among Danish health care workers. PloS one, 9(7), e103425. Tabak, R. G., Hipp, J. A., Marx, C.M., Brownson, R. C. (2015) Workplace Social and Organizational Environments and Healthy-Weight Behaviors. PLoS ONE 10(4): e0125424.Yeh, T. L., Chen, H. H., Chiu, H. H., Chiu, Y. H., Hwang, L. C., & Wu, S. L. (2019). Morbidity associated with overweight and obesity in health personnel: a 10-year retrospective of hospital-based cohort study in Taiwan. Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity: targets and therapy, 12, 267–274.

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